our company

One of my and Anne Saita’s goals as business owners was to be mentors to other business owners—a way to impart our knowledge culled over our careers working for others and the five years working on our own content creation company, Twirling Tiger Media. Early on in our business, our company benefited greatly as recipients of a year-long mentorship under the tutelage of professionals at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts and we wanted to...

Be Bold, Be Brave … and Be More Successful by Using a Business Framework

We recently received word US Trademark Registration 5,526,278 is approved. This means we now are the only International Class 35 (content marketing services) company that can legally claim the name Twirling Tiger. It also means that we could, and maybe should, pepper all online and print mentions of our name with the  [registration] symbol (which for some reason won’t show up as intended here). Naming a company is not arbitrary, despite how whimsical or eponymous...

What’s in a Name? Plenty.

Thanks to a flood of contract writers and the rise of content mills, the commerce of writing is taking a huge economic hit. So are writers who depend on their craft to earn a living. That’s why freelance writers need a contract. Statements of work or author agreements —or whatever such  contracts are  called—are designed to clearly explain expectations and publishing rights. Most writers understand the deliverables and deadlines. It’s the publishing rights that can...

Why Writers Need a Contract

It’s May Day, where nations celebrate both spring and International Workers Day. The latter is often associated with socialist nations, but its birthplace is the United States in the 1880s, with Chicago at its epicenter. It is easy to forget the conditions our ancestors were forced to endure in order to earn a living. Minimum 12-hour workdays. No meal or bio breaks. No weekends off or shortened, if any, vacations. Wait! We’re talking about times...

Are We Working Too Hard at Working?

When the #deletefacebook movement erupted, my business partner Maureen joked, “Perhaps we’ll soon follow up our ‘Why We Dumped Twitter’ post with one about why we dropped Facebook.” But we haven’t dropped Facebook, at least not yet. Yes, our engagement stats recently dropped significantly, even before the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which highlighted just how loose Facebook’s privacy policies have been and how invasive its business model really is. Some of the drop-off is basic attribution;...

Why We Haven’t Dropped Facebook…Yet

Last year Maureen and I created personal learning plans to help us keep on top of trends and news in our respective industries and despite very busy schedules. We encourage each of you to do the same. It’s easy … and free. Just document how and where you want to be better educated this year, or even this quarter or month. Then organize activities by calendar to track what you’ve done or still need to...

What We’re Reading, Watching and Listening To

When I was asked to give my thoughts and perspectives on the next generation of marketers, I thought it would be easy to describe them. I’ve been teaching at the college level for the past 17 years (yikes!). As a practitioner faculty member at a small, private college for the past four years, I’ve seen the youngest of the millennial generation in my most recent marketing classes. And to be honest, they live up the...

The (Mostly) Pros and Cons of Working with Millennial Marketers

A major component of any editorial project is the equivalent of scholar peer review: copyediting. Copy editors are the unsung heroes who search for flaws in concepts or unsupported claims. They examine a piece’s organization and structure. Then they comb through copy line by line for spelling, grammar, punctuation and style mistakes. Content producers tend to be strong in one of two basic tools of the trade: research and composing. If writers excel at tracking down...

The Editorial Version of Peer Review: Copyediting

This past Saturday I joined 15,000 others in San Diego for the March for Science, an event that emphasized support for science and evidence-based policymaking. It was billed as “adamantly nonpartisan,” but in today’s polemical climate, it is increasingly hard to appear politics-neutral. And, let’s face it, there wouldn’t have been the need for Saturday’s worldwide march if federal funding for environmental protections and scientific research wasn’t imperiled. As a business owner and editorial director,...

‘I like big brains and I cannot lie’

I took my place at an empty table in the hope other business people would populate its seats after exiting the bountiful buffet line. The reason for our collective attendance to the recent Department of Defense Northeast Regional Council conference was to have a 15-minute audience with a federal government agency, or a prime enterprise that may be offering subcontracting opportunities to small- and medium-sized businesses—in order that they may fulfill supplier diversity quotas. (Twirling...

Making Connections Through Conferences, Content Marketing and…Spam?